Debating Gender-Based Violence with male villagers in Northern Tanzania

In December 2020, we held debates with 60 local men in Bonchugu village and Nyamburi village, Northern Tanzania, around the impact of female genital mutilation (FGM) and other forms of gender-based violence. They voiced their views on questions including;

  • Why do men like to marry girls who are cut?
  • Why do men not like to marry girls who are not cut?
  • What are the challenges that girls who are cut are likely to face in their society?

This fostered a dialogue that challenged gender roles and practices as a step towards ending harmful practices against girls and women.

Those gathered discussed how men prefer to marry circumcised girls so that they can protect their wealth, earn respect within their communities, and build recognition as keepers of their customs and traditions.

They also examined how men did not like to marry uncircumcised girls because they believed that it would be a curse on their families. Men and their wives would be segregated by other villagers as girls who are not cut are not allowed to participate in traditional ceremonies and partake in community decisions. Some of the challenges faced by girls who marry without being cut were raised and included:

  • They will likely face segregation among community members
  • They may be called names and insulted
  • They will not be involved in activities of their tradition
  • They will be prohibited from contributing to community decisions.

We then evaluated the challenges that girls face when they undergo female genital mutilation. Men were educated on how girls face bleeding during cutting, which may lead to death, and how it is possible to be infected with diseases such as HIV due to cutters using the same tools across recipients.

Locals discussed how to end gender-based violence in their societies. Men believed that governments should more strictly enforce the law, and education should be provided to community members. In addition, traditional elders should be taught the impact of gender-based violence and be convinced to align with governmental goals for abolishing it. More safe houses should also be constructed to protect girls during this period of drastic change.

We then listed baseline expectations among locals to be ambassadors during the fight against gender-based violence. Men should inform the police when they detect unwarranted practices in their villages and should educate their communities about the impact of FGM and gender-based violence at large.

Holding debates and community outreach events can foster a continuing dialogue that will challenge and change existing norms around gender practices. Being able to engage men in villages in this way is also a huge indication of the progress being made, we will continue to build upon these opportunities to have an open dialogue with individuals who previously would have been unwilling to do so.

This debate formed part of our recognition of the United Nation’s 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence. Please see our series of blog posts and our social channels for further information on the events we have been involved in during this important 16 days.

How mapping is helping Tanzanian villages source water

At the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team global conference on Friday December 4 2020, Herry Kasunga talked about the Water Source mapping project that he has been coordinating with the Hope for Girls and Women digital champions.

This is an extremely important project as the majority of people in Mara, as in the rest of Tanzania, are dependent on rainwater for household water, sanitation and to grow their food.

It is also estimated that 40% of village water sources are degraded or non-functional. The shots below show some of the water points used by the digital champions:

In addition, climate change further threatens water access and means droughts and average temperature rises are likely, coupled with intense flooding events with significant damage to infrastructure and livelihoods, meaning mapping will become even more important.

Herry’s presentation slides can be viewed and downloaded here.

An exciting collaboration between FAWCO and Hope

Rhobi and some of the Hope girls

The Hope for Girls and Women team is very grateful and humbled to confirm that we have been selected as the Federation of American Women’s Clubs Overseas’ (FAWCO) Target Project running from 2020 until 2022.

FAWCO Member Clubs voted in February to select the 2020-2022 Target Project. Hope’s project: S.A.F.E. (Safe Alternatives for FGM Elimination) was selected from the three short-listed projects identified by the Target Selection Committee.

The two-year collaborative project between Hope and FAWCO will have the following objectives:

  1. Provide protection and health services to survivors of FGM and those at risk of undergoing the practice,
  2. Empower 500 families to embrace a life free from FGM for all family members through psychosocial counselling,
  3. Support 200 women and 300 girls who have already been cut to live healthy and fulfilled lives through psychosocial and healthcare support,
  4. Empower 5 local communities to adopt positive social norms which uphold the human rights and health of all community members through community sensitisation and public declarations against FGM by respected community leaders during 2 annual Alternative Rites of Passage (ARP) ceremonies over the two years of the project,
  5. Empower 50 girls and 50 women through economic generating activities for enhancing access to National Health Insurance Fund (NHIF) plan and ability to pay costs related to health services.

With the global network that FAWCO offers, we can help to build awareness of the need to end FGM in Tanzania and across the world.